October 2010


There is a clock on the refrigerator that tells baby time. First-time guests think it’s a toy teach-me-clock but it actually serves many purposes. With a newborn set the clock to the time of the last feeding ~ better to gauge the next feeding or why she is crying. With a toddler set the clock to the time of yesterday’s nap ~ know when to start winding down for naptime. Magnets mark when there was poop ~ helps plan outings. It’s easier to read than a note that will get lost in the daily shuffle.

Baby clock indicates that our toddler napped at 11:30am with poops after breakfast and lunch yesterday.

Try using magnets of different colors or shapes for each child. Maybe even one to indicate when they got medicine…it is cold season.

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Now it’s not like I have a lot of time on my hands, but making yogurt at home is not as hard as it sounds. All you need is a food thermometer, milk, a single serving of yogurt and someplace to keep milk warm and clean for 6 – 12 hours. The dusty old rice cooker is perfect for the job, especially since crock pots/large ovens/bread machines are not commonplace in Korea. I like controlling the sugar content since it’s impossible to find unsweetened yogurt at the market.

Homemade Yogurt

1000 mL milk

100 g plain yogurt

optional: sugar, jam, vanilla, honey, and so on.

Take the milk to 118*F in the rice cooker (unplug) and then thoroughly stir in yogurt. Check the temperature every few hours (do not stir!), the ideal temperature for yogurt is 100*F (plug it in for a few minutes if needed). Anywhere from 6 – 12 hours later the milk will transform into yogurt, even if completely unattended. The longer it sits at 100*F the thicker and tangier it will taste. Transfer into container for the fridge, add your optional flavoring. Let cool the yogurt cool overnight before eating. It will keep for about a week.

On Sundays I’ve been hearing horse hooves and neighing outside my window. Strange but true, there was a horse drawn carriage trotting through my neighborhood.

It turns out that the local church provides rides for its members.